Here is one of my daily quotes from Abraham.  You can go to their site and sign up for your own daily quotes.  I find much truth in these.  They make me feel good.  They make me think about what I am focusing on and what I am attracting in my life.  

"We are really advocates of just getting as happy as you can be—which takes care of everything. Even if you don't have reason to be happy—make it up. Fantasize it. Make a decision that you're going to be happy one way or another—no matter what. "No matter what, I'm going to be happy! If I have to ignore everybody; if I have to never watch television again; if I have to never pick up a newspaper again, I'm going to be happy. If I never have to see that person's face again, I'm going to be happy. If I have to see that person's face, I'm going to find something to see in that person's face that makes me happy. I'm going to be happy. I'm going to be happy. I'm going to be happy."

---Abraham      Excerpted from: Sacramento, CA on March 15, 2003

The Digest Blog

Health Blog about Digesting Food and Life in General by Deb Kitt, Dr. Mom - The Digestion Expert

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(via Vegan Vanilla Lime Green Smoothie –)

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How To Develop Better Nutrition Habits

organicfoodsblog-blog:

What we put into our bodies can often have a dramatic effect on our physical, mental, and emotional health. Good nutrition is vital to a happy and healthy life. So if you’re interested in improving your overall quality of life, but are looking for tips to jump-start the process, this article is for you!

If you are having a hard time starting an exercise regiment to get your body in a healthy state, then you need to enlist a workout buddy. You need to make a pact with a friend, partner or child that you both will exercise together so that exercise becomes fun and exciting.

Be careful with fat-soluble vitamins. The body can eliminate excess amounts of water-soluble vitamins like B-complex or Vitamin C, but tends to retain fat-soluble vitamins like Vitamins A, D, and E, which can cause toxicity at high doses. To be safe, don’t take megadoses of fat-soluble vitamins except on a doctor’s advice.

If you are trying to eat a healthy diet and are trying to decide on a restaurant, you may want to look online before heading out for dinner. Many restaurants now post their menus online so you can look at the options that they have available before you even leave your home.

Consume less dairy. While some milk and dairy products can be healthy and full of protein, they should still be consumed in moderation. Many people are lactose intolerant; however it is often so mild that it does not cause major symptoms. The intolerance only becomes apparent when the dairy is removed and the person notices an improvement in overall health.

When it comes to nutrition, dessert can be one of the hardest meals, but a lot of people forget about fruit which makes for a healthy and smart dessert choice. If fruits aren’t your thing, try making it into a smoothie or making fruit muffins or even try something like sherbert to satisfy your sweet craving without sacrificing nutrition.

You should always eat food to avoid having the bad breath. Bad breath can be caused by the fats that are cannibalized by your body in the starvation state. When your body is lacking in nutrition it starts to burn your fat stores. These fat stores get converted into ketone bodies, which generate the bad breath smell. By eating a small portion of food the body is able to use the energy from the food, rather than relying on your fat; no ketone bodies are formed when you burn glucose.

If you are looking to get all of the essential amino acids that your body needs, then you are going to need to eat protein everyday. There are not vary many vegetarian sources where you can get these essential amino acids. You need all sorts of food to stay healthy.

For healthful snacks when you are on the run, pre-package some homemade trail mix of salt free dried nuts and fruit. Remember that fresh fruit is already “pre-packaged”! Whole, fresh fruit like apples, oranges, bananas and pears, as well as veggies, such as carrots, are great to carry along for hassle-free nutritious snacking, anywhere.

Seniors must consume at least eight glasses of water every day.  Generally, they are prone to dehydration due to the fact that the body loses some of its ability to regulate fluid levels and the sense of thirst is not as keen as when younger.  The water will also flush the system and work to avoid constipation and urinary tract infections.

Breakfast is really the most important meal of the day. It has been repeated so often that it has become a cliché, but the fact remains that you should not skip breakfast. Even if you are not hungry, eating a healthy breakfast will ensure that  your body has the fuel it needs to make it through the day.

Always choose whole grain breads and cereals for the greatest nutritional value and most benefit to your digestive system. Whole grain breads, crackers, tortilla chips, oatmeal and other cereals have not been stripped of their nutritional benefit by excessive processing. Additionally, they provide your digestive system with valuable exercise to keep it working properly!

Keep your sodium intake to less than 2300 milligrams a day (preferably less than 1500 milligrams a day if possible) to maintain a nutritious diet. Too much sodium, usually the result of eating too many processed foods, can result in kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.

If you are going to prevent yourself from over eating and drowning your body in excess calories, make sure that you calculate your daily caloric needs. This will give you a limit for the amount of calories you can intake each day. There are a variety of services that will help you calculate this value.

To smooth out your nutritional intake, make sure you take a multivitamin appropriate to your gender and age. It’s no substitute for eating real foods with the nutrients you crave, but if your diet is deficient in one area, a multivitamin hedge will lessen the chances of cravings for certain foods. Multivitamins are not a crutch, but they can actually serve as a layer of appetite control.

When nutrition comes up, it always seems to center around carbs and how much is too much or not enough. Roughly three fourths of your daily calorie intake should consist of carbs. When choosing what foods to get your carb intake make sure that you choose foods which still also contain their fiber content in order to maintain a healthy regimen.

To add more nutrition to your caffeine fix, try mixing a citrus soda like Mountain Dew with a complimentary fruit juice like V8 Splash. This way you can still get your soda fix but also add some nutritious and useful calories to the indulgence. Over time, you should reduce the amount of soda and increase the amount of juice until you feel comfortable cutting the soda out altogether.

Organic Foods

Buy organic versions of food considered part of the “dirty dozen”. These foods may have an unacceptable amount of pesticides on them. These include apples, spinach, peaches, and others. If you can’t find or afford organic foods, spend the time to wash your food well. Some foods on the “clean list” do not need to be organic.

Eat fruits and vegetables in season and purchase from a local farmer’s market if possible. Fresh local produce has more vitamins and minerals than produce shipped from another state or out of the country. Organic foods, which are healthier for you and environment, are usually easier to find at farmer’s markets as well.

Feed your body throughout the day with foods that maximize your energy and health. Three meals and two snacks or even five small “meals” which consist of fresh, organic foods will keep your system functioning at peak levels. Consistent fueling allows for a higher, more consistent metabolism which in turn keeps your weight down.

Eating organic foods can be an effective way of increasing the nutritional content of your diet.  Mounting scientific evidence shows that organic foods are higher in nutrients, and lower in nitrates.  Organic building blocks form healthier foods, just as Mother Nature intended.  Take one taste and you will understand.

Choose organic fruits and vegetables whenever possible. Organic food is grown without pesticides and fungicides. While organic foods can be more expensive, the long term health benefits save money in future health care costs. The more unnatural things you can cut out of your diet the healthier you will be.

Try to include organic foods as part of your nutritional diet. Organic foods are grown free of pesticides, hormones, and chemicals that can potentially cause problems in your body. Organic foods are also known to contain more nutrients and vitamins then their non-organic counterparts. In addition, organic foods often taste better.

To have a healthy body we need to keep track of what we eat. There is a very popular saying that goes to say that you are what you eat. That is entirely true, therefore it is important to limit the consumption of processed food and take in more organic foods.

Make sure that the food that you put into your body is helping you to achieve your goal of having a happier, healthier life. In this article, we have given you some tips to jump-start your overall nutrition. Now it is up to you, use these tips to benefit you!

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H2Know: What’s Really Happening When Your Body Is Dehydrated?

Credit to:  JANUARY 14, 2015 |

BY SALLY TAMARKIN

Unavoidable fact, or thoroughly debunked fiction? We should all be drinking eight, eight-ounce glasses of water per day. It turns out that the old eight-by-eight rule originated from a misreading of a 1945 recommendation from the Food and Nutrition Board and over the next five decades just kind of became accepted wisdom.

But the 64-ounces-in-a-day directive has been abandoned and replaced with the Board’s 2004 recommendation that we figure out how much to drink each day by “letting our thirst be [our] guide.” It turns out that between the water we get from beverages (yup, even caffeinated ones), water-rich fruits and vegetables, and our bodies’ super sophisticated mechanism for regulating water balance, maintaining hydration is fairly simple for most healthy adults. Under certain circumstances (like when we get sick, work out extra hard, or exert ourselves in the heat) our bodies have a harder time keeping up with fluid loss and we can become dehydrated.  But what exactly does that mean?

Our Bodies, Our Cells

The importance of water to our bodies can’t be overstated. After all, it makes up more than two-thirds of our body weight and is responsible for a variety of functions, including digestion, blood flow, and body temperature regulation, as well as for overall cell health. Fortunately, the fact that we lose between roughly four to nine cups of water per day through breathing, sweating, peeing, and pooping isn’t a problem for most healthy adults because the systems that regulate hydration are so sensitive. According to CamelBak Hydration Advisor Doug Casa, Ph.D., evidence shows that the body will compensate for a loss of just one to two percent of the total amount of water in the body by triggering the sensation of thirst and the cue to drink. These cues stay on track and properly-timed because our brains, kidneys, various glands, and hormones work in concert to monitor the amount of water that we’re taking in versus how much we’re losing.

It all begins with the hypothalamus, the gland responsible for regulating our body temperature and triggering the processes that balance the fluids in our bodies. When the hypothalamus detects too little water in our blood, it signals the release of an anti-diuretic hormone that causes the kidneys to remove less water from the blood. The result? We pee less, and when we do, our urine is more concentrated and darker in color. At this point the brain also tells us we’re thirsty, and once we sip on some water or consume something hydrating our water levels return to normal. Similarly, when our body temperature rises either from fever, working out, or being in a warm environment, our bodies try to lower our temperature by sweating: When sweat evaporates from our skin, it takes some heat with it, helping to cool us off.

But although we lose water when we sweat, pee, and breathe, our bodies are so darn good at triggering thirst and cueing urination that it’s only when we’re losing more water than we can replace—think sweating like crazy, throwing up, having diarrhea, or peeing excessively, or maybe even spending a long night drinking—that we experience dehydration .

Hot, Tired, and Thirsty: How Dehydration Feels

When dehydration occurs, we experience a range of symptoms from dry mouth, headaches, dizziness, and fatigue to lethargy, cool skin, and the inability to pee (because our kidneys have been told not to excrete scarce fluid). Here’s how it works: Water is integral to regulating blood volume, which in turn affects blood pressure and heart rate. When we’re dehydrated our blood volume drops, and so does our blood pressure, causing our hearts to beat faster. For some, dehydration causes headaches or triggers migraines. Though the link between water balance and headaches is still being researched, one theory is that as our bodies work to maintain fluid levels during dehydration our blood vessels narrow, reducing the supply of oxygen and blood to the brain, which causes headaches. So basically, when our cells are deprived of the water they need to function optimally, all systems are especially taxed and must work harder to power us, causing us to feel fatigued or lethargic.

Dehydration affects us cognitively and psychologically, too. Studies have shown that even mild dehydration can cause dips in concentration, memory, and mood. 

The Takeaway

The amount of water we need varies from person to person and depends on what we’re eating and drinking, the climate, and our activity level. Healthy adults can pretty much rely on their body’s thirst mechanism to keep them hydrated. And if you’re eating fruits and vegetables and drinking fluids you’re probably getting the water you need.

However, there are circumstances when we need to pay more attention to how hydrated we are: when we’re exercising hard, in the heat, or for long periods of time (or in some combination of these conditions), or when we’re sick with fever or a stomach bug that causes diarrhea or vomiting  .

Our bodies are actually so smart about maintaining water balance that when we sweat excessively and are losing salt and other electrolytes, we’re cued to crave drinks that both quench thirst and contain sodium. During prolonged workouts, Casa recommends going for drinks that have carbohydrates and electrolytes (like sports drinks or coconut water) which will keep you hydrated even when you’re sweating like a champ. Plus, they can help take the edge off post-workout fatigue. 

In helping to replenish valuable electrolytes, which could happen if we’re guzzling plain water, sports drinks prevent us from getting overhydrated. When we drink way more water than we need, our kidneys can’t keep up and we’re unable to urinate enough to get our water level back in balance. As a result, the sodium in our blood becomes diluted, and water intoxication occurs, causing symptoms like a headache, fatigue, nausea or vomiting, confusion, or even seizures. There is no set amount of water that causes intoxication. Instead, Casa says we can avoid overdoing it by drinking “according to the sensation of thirst.” He also recommends getting a handle on how much fluid we’re losing while working out by determining our sweat rate.

To make sure we’re hydrated, our brains, organs, and hormones do the heavy lifting, keeping our fluids balanced without us having to think much about it. But the better we know our bodies and how we handle exercise, sickness, and climate changes, we can be sure that we’re not doing anything to sabotage the precise and involuntary processes that keep everything flowing and functioning. And if you’re planning for workouts or trying to ballpark how much water you’re likely to want over the course of your day, you can always get an estimate by using a hydration calculator.


Article courtesy: http://greatist.com/health/hydration-body-whats-really-happening

Posted 51 weeks ago

34 Proven Ways Water Makes You Awesome

From the stuff we drink and swim in, to the steam that eases congestion and the ice that reduces swelling, water is all around us (and even in us). Heck, it kind of is us. “Water makes up about two-thirds of who we are, and influences 100 percent of the processes in our body,” says CamelBak hydration expert Doug Casa, PhD. That probably explains why we feel better when we’re drinking enough of it. To learn exactly how water is helping us, as well as some creative ways to use it, check out these 34 reasons why you should go hydrate right now.

1. It could aid weight loss.
Anyone looking to lose weight could be helped by upping their water intake. Studies have found that when participants drink water before a meal, they lose weight faster than those who did not drink water. Extra H2O helps us eat less by making us feel full, and it may also boost metabolism. CamelBak hydration advisor Kate Geagan, RD says it’s not uncommon to put on weight by mistaking thirst for hunger, and she offers this pro tip: Next time you feel fatigued or sluggish, “drinking water may be just what [you] need to perk up.”

2. It powers our warm-weather exercise.
With the proper precautions, working out in the heat is usually fine—and staying hydrated is one of the most important things you can do. The hotter the workout, the sweatier we tend to get, so it’s extra important to replace those lost fluids. Determining sweat rate informs good rehydration strategy: “Once an athlete [knows his or her] sweat rate, they can begin to practice replacing these fluid losses in training and be optimally prepared for [athletic exertion],” says Casa. 

3. It keeps things moving, digestion-wise.
Water helps us, you know, go by helping dissolve fats and soluble fiber. Drinking enough water prevents constipation and also reduces the burden on the kidneys and liver by helping to flush waste products. Geagan breaks it down: “In the large intestine, water binds with fiber to increase the bulk of the stools, reduce transit time and make elimination easier. When you don’t drink enough water and fluids, the colon pulls water from stools, increasing your risk of constipation.”

4. It helps endurance athletes fight fatigue.
Water is an integral part of most any workout, and it becomes especially important in order to prevent dehydration during long workouts. When exercising for an hour or more, drinking water treated with carbohydrates and salts (by mixing in tablets such as Nuun, or making a DIY version) can help maintain fluid balance, which aids athletic performance and helps prevent post-exercise fatigue and exhaustion. 

5. It might protect against some types of cancer.
Research has found that the greater the fluid intake, the lower the incidence of bladder cancer, with more significant results when the fluid is water. One possible reason could be that urinating more frequently prevents the buildup of bladder carcinogens. Staying hydrated may also reduce the risk of colon cancer and breast cancer.

6. It can improve mood.
Drinking water makes us feel so refreshed that it actually improves our state of mind. You don’t even have to be severely in need of it to benefit: Even mild dehydration has been shown to negatively impact moods. 

7. Fun, frozen workouts are great for you.
When it’s too snowy or icy to go for a run, or you want a workout that’s as fun as it is good for you, find yourself some frozen water. Try ice skating for a low-impact workout that challenges your balance, get in some hill work while sledding, get a full-body workout while cross-country skiing, or improve your cardiovascular endurance with snow-shoeing.

8. Drinking it may help prevent headaches, naturally.
Going without water for too long causes headaches for some people, and has been identified as a migraine trigger. The good news is that in a study on the effects of water on headaches, participants experienced “total relief” from their headaches within 30 minutes of drinking water (two cups, on average). Geagan says a good way to prevent headaches is to stay hydrated throughout the day. And if you’ve already been hit with a dehydration-triggered headache, you’ll need significantly more water to help it go away. She recommends drinking two to four cups of water for headache relief within one to two hours.

9. It keeps our kidneys working.
Kidneys remove waste from our bodies, help control our blood pressure, and balance fluids, so they’re crucial to keeping our systems running smoothly. One surefire way to keep them working properly? Adequate water consumption! So drink up to keep those kidneys in tip-top shape.

10. It energizes us.
Next time you’re feeling zonked, try drinking a couple glasses of water. Feeling tired is one of the first signs of dehydration and filling back up on H2O could zap the sleepiness. 

11. Soda water makes healthier cocktails.
Fizzy water is a staple for healthier versions of favorite boozy beverages. Using seltzer water and fresh fruit instead of sugary mixers makes for a delicious, better-for-you drink (that can also help prevent dehydration).

12. It may help keep us alert.
If you’re going to need to concentrate for long periods of time, keep water handy to help you stay refreshed, hydrated, and focused: Dehydration can impair your attention span, memory, and motor skills.

13. It protects our joints and cartilage.
Water keeps the cartilage around our joints hydrated and supple, ensuring that our joints stay lubricated. It also protects our spinal cord and tissues, keeping us healthy from the inside out. Geagan explains that cartilage—the rubbery material that coats our bones—is about 85 percent water. To keep this protective material healthy, we need to keep hydrated.

14. It powers our cold-weather workouts.
Most of us think of those sweaty, summer workouts as the ones we should be guzzling water before, during, and after. But staying hydrated while exercising in the cold is crucial, too: One of the ways our bodies lose water is through respiration, and when we exercise in the cold, we’re working harder under the extra layers of clothing and breathing more heavily as a result. But even though we’re doubling down on fluid loss, one study found that cold weather weakens thirst. The result? We’re working hard, losing water, and not getting any body cues to drink up, which can lead to dehydration.

15. Soaking in a warm bath or shower may make us feel less lonely.
Researchers have concluded that when people are lonely and seeking connectedness, they spend more time in warm baths and showers, substituting physical warmth for emotional warmth. Doing so seems to ease loneliness and feelings of isolation. Warm baths may also cue oxytocin, the hormone responsible for making us feel relaxed and bonded with others. Typically released when we’re experiencing closeness to others, researchers believe that rises in body temperature can cause it to be released, too (though we should mention that this study was done on rats, not humans).

16. It takes the edge off of hangovers.
Drinking alcohol causes dehydration, which can lead to hangovers. Having a glass of water with each alcoholic drink you sip is one way to offset the dehydration (and the day-after misery).

17. It helps us think more clearly.
Dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue. So when we haven’t been drinking enough water, our brains have to work a lot harder to perform at the same level. One study even found that students who brought water to tests did better on their exams.

18. It cleans non-toxically.
Whether you need to clean your home, clothes, dishes, laundry, or yourself, water is the basic ingredient in many all-natural cleaning products. These products have all the cleansing punch with none of the toxicity, which is better for homes, health, and the environment.

19. Gargling keeps you healthier.
A study that followed 400 participants during cold and flu season found that those who gargled water regularly were significantly less likely to contract upper respiratory infections and that when they did, their symptoms weren’t as severe. (Maybe it’s time to supplement that flu shot with funny throat noises!). 

20. Eating it hydrates us—deliciously.
Water-rich fruits and vegetables like cucumber, watermelon, and strawberries contain minerals, salts, and natural sugars the body needs for optimum hydration levels, so eating them can sometimes rehydrate us more effectively (and a lot more tastily) than water alone.

21. Working out in it (yes, in it) is good for aerobic fitness.
Deep water running and water aerobics offer cardio workouts without the impact. For cross training that’s no-impact and low-stress, hit the pool. Then there’s aqua spinning, which has been growing in popularity for a reason: It provides a workout as effective as cycling on land, and might even offer increased cardiovascular benefits.

22. Living near it is good for our health.
One study showed that good health is more prevalent the closer one lives to the coast. Whether it’s the proximity to sea air, greenery, or opportunities to soak up the sunshine on the beach, spending time near the water makes us healthier.

23. It balances our fluids.
About 60 percent of the human body is made of water, and keeping our fluids balanced means that all that water is doing its job—transporting nutrients, aiding digestion, regulating temperature, and so on.

24. Its sounds are soothing.
Exposure to unpleasant noises (screams, scrapes, electric drills, subway trains, perhaps?) can elevate our pulse and blood pressure and cause stress hormones to be released. In contrast, in one study, participants rated bubbling water as the most pleasing sound they were asked to listen to. The sounds of water flowing have also been found to have therapeutic effects.

25. Swimming around in it works out the body and mind.
Swimming has been found to improve long-term physical and mental health and is a great option for anyone who wants an impact-free cardio workout. Those seeking peace of mind might consider diving in too; spending time in the pool is believed to reduce depression.

26. When frozen, it provides pain and swelling relief for soft tissue injuries.
Ice has been shown to be an effective short-term therapy for sprains and strains. Cold packs reduce blood flow and swelling in the affected area and also treat pain.

27. Spending time in cold water is good for athletes.
Studies show that immersion in cold water is beneficial for sustained athletic performance in the heat, and for treating muscle damage after exercise. On hot days, immersion in cold water can keep body temperatures level and blood flowing.

28. It’s been linked to heart health.
Can drinking water keep our heart healthy? There seems to be a link between risk of death from coronary heart disease and water intake: Research has shown both that consuming more water means a lower risk of death from coronary heart disease and that risk of death rises when intake of “high-energy fluids” (like soda and juice) increases.

29. A warm foot bath before bed could help you sleep.
One small study found that adults with sleeping problems experienced better sleep and less wakefulness on nights they received a warm water foot bath before going to bed.

30. Waterbeds can help some people with back pain.
Perhaps there’s a therapeutic reason that waterbeds were all the rage in the ‘70s and ‘80s. Research indicates that waterbed mattresses are associated with improving back pain symptoms and providing a good night’s sleep (though the benefits were small).

31. It may help relieve congestion.
Stuffy nose got you down? Inhaling steam from a humidifier or pot of boiling water can help clear up congestion. Salt water can also break up all the gunk that makes us stuffy: Stream it from one nostril to the other with a neti pot or try a saline nose spray to loosen things up.

32. Shoveling after a heavy snowfall makes for great cardio.
Okay, so snow’s not exactly water, but it’s definitely similar enough! If you’ve ever spent time shoveling after a snowstorm and felt like you got a darn good workout, it’s because you did. In fact, shoveling snow makes demands on the body similar to a treadmill workout at maximum effort. As long as you’re already in good cardiovascular health, grab a snow shovel the next time heavy snowfall sidetracks your workout plans! (To avoid injury and strain: Warm up first and use proper shoveling technique—snow shoveling is hard work and can cause injury!). 

33. Spa therapy could relieve pain and aid relaxation.
If you suffer from chronic pain, a hot-water soak could help. A review of spa therapy (soaking in baths of hot water or mineral water) showed that it has been an effective treatment for pain and rheumatic disorders.

34. Soaking up steam heat is good for the heart.
Relaxing in a sauna could be as healthy as it is calming. In one small study, participants who sat in a sauna for 15 minutes every day for three weeks showed improved heart function and blood pumping capabilities and were able to exercise more. Researchers concluded that sauna therapy could be an effective complement or alternative treatment for some people with chronic heart failure.

Article Credit:  JANUARY 6, 2015 |

BY SALLY TAMARKIN

http://greatist.com/health/health-benefits-water

Posted 52 weeks ago
Posted 53 weeks ago

New Reasons To Eat Your Spinach

Before Sesame St., there was Popeye the Sailor Man, and as everyone knows, he got his strength by swallowing spinach by the canful. Moms and Dads everywhere used to point out his example to their kids to get them to eat their veggies. 

It’s a new day and a new time, and out of a can isn’t the first way most of us would think to eat our spinach. That doesn’t mean it’s not still important. In fact, as the field of nutritional science develops, and we learn more each day about the best way to eat to maintain vibrantly good health and avoid the chronic diseases of aging, we learn that spinach still ranks right up there at the top of the list of foods to include in our diet.

Dr. Joel Fuhrman provides some simple visuals for a diet focused on Nutrient Density, a simple equation which offers the best nutrition in the least calories. It calls for 90% plant-foods, and greens are right at the top of the ANDI (Aggregate Nutrient Density Index) Food Scores. The Food Pyramid provides another visual.

Turns out this kind of diet addresses a host of health problems, including the results of eating too many acidic foods, linked to pain and excess weight as well as bone health, muscle wasting, chronic diseases like hypertension and stroke, cardiovascular health and memory and cognition issues. Too much uric acid in your system also links to some kinds of kidney stones and gout.

When you consume acidic foods like sugar, meat, food additives, transfats and fried foods in small amounts, your kidneys process them, excrete excess acid and maintain your body pH at just about 7.4 where it belongs, very slightly alkaline. Unfortunately in today’s world, we’re surrounded with and eat highly processed food and beverage items loaded with added sugars (under at least 57 different names) and other food additives.

To make matters worse, we eat too much meat, too much protein in general, and too many fried foods. Dr. Fuhrman’s Food Pyramid suggests that non-plant foods (good fats, meat, dairy and whole grains) should be just 10% of your diet. Health experts recommend protein content in our diet of 12-20%, but most Americans are getting a lot more, almost 50 per cent more than the recommend daily amount and not nearly enough vegetables and fruits. 

Yet an acidic condition depletes oxygen in our bodies, which every cell needs to function properly. It damages mitochondria, the cells’ energy centers, interfering with vital functions. It can damage tissues, joints, organs and glands, resulting in various kinds of imbalances or dysfunction. If your body stores acid in tissues and joints, that damages them over time. If it depletes minerals like calcium from your bones and magnesium from muscles, it weakens both.

Some of the recommendations to prevent or control these conditions might end up feeling somewhat medicinal, like drinking lemon or apple cider vinegar water daily or eating seaweed products. Of course, if you like those things, have at it – but there are also some delicious solutions out there that you can build into your daily diet.

Start by familiarizing yourself with Dr. Fuhrman’s diet suggestions and visuals. A Nutrient Dense Diet with its 90% plant food recommendation and greens at the top of the list provides you with a great platform.

Another good resource is the PRAL (Potential Renal Acid Load) Index from Dr. Thomas Remer. Dr. Remer devised a method to calculate the impact on our bodies of the acidic content in food, much like the Glycemic Index shows the impact of sugars in food. The results of Dr. Remer’s study displayed in the Index reinforce the dietary recommendations of the Nutritarian Diet (80% alkalizing foods from Dr. Remer’s results and 90% plant foods in the Nutritarian Diet). 

If gout or certain kinds of kidney stones are an issue for you, talk with a naturopath about how to integrate greens into your diet without triggering other problems – otherwise, consider almost all veggies and most fruits alkaline inducing.

Posted 55 weeks ago